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Sheppy Dog Fund Lecture
“Drop Me Off in Harlem!”
Modernist Aesthetics & the American Artist

February 22 • 6p
FIA Theater
Free to the public

Guest Lecturer
Kelli Morgan

Known as an era of burgeoning Black cultural production, the Harlem Renaissance was a combination of artists, patrons, writers, musicians, intellectuals, and performers working in and through modernist forms to express the multidimensionality of African American life. Centering the New Negro Movement and complicating the narrative of American Modernism, Kelli Morgan, Lowe Curatorial Fellow at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, analyzes some of the Renaissance’s most popular artworks, literature, figures, and debates.

Curator, author, teacher and lecturer Kelli Morgan holds both a B.A. in African American Studies and an M.A. in Afro-American Studies from Wayne State University. Morgan has worked in a variety of curatorial, programming, and research positions at various institutions, including Wayne State University, University of Massachusetts Amherst, and the Birmingham Museum of Art. A visual imagery analyst, Morgan examines the ways in which people construct visual discourses, conceptualize images, and sometimes resist these discourses. Her interdisciplinary research concentrates on African American visual culture, linking Art History, Women’s Studies, African American History, and Museum Studies to consider the complex ways that Black women artists visualize, represent, and reappropriate images of minority women to challenge mainstream visual discourses concerning beauty and sexuality.

Henry Bannarn<br />
American, 1910–1965<br />
<em>Ironing Day</em>, 1949<br />
Gouache on board<br />
20 x 16 inches. <br />
Courtesy of the Isabel Foundation, Inlander Collection, L2003.36
VIEW LARGER IMAGE

Henry Bannarn
American, 1910–1965
Ironing Day, 1949
Gouache on board
20 x 16 inches.
Courtesy of the Isabel Foundation, Inlander Collection, L2003.36

The Sheppy Dog Fund Lecture has been established to address the topics of art, religion and history prior to the 19th century, and is funded annually by the Sheppy Dog Fund, Dr. Alan Klein, Advisor.

Media Sponsor
WKAR
Book Discussion
The Invention of Wings
by Sue Monk Kidd

Part I: Art Lecture
January 25 • 1:30p


Part II: Book Discussion
February 8 • 1:30p


Free to the public

A triumphant story about the quest for freedom and empowerment, Sue Monk Kidd’s third novel presents the extraordinary journeys of two unforgettable women: Hetty “Handful” Grimké, an urban slave in early 19th-century Charleston, and Sarah, the Grimkés’ idealistic daughter.

Inspired in part by the historic figure of abolitionist and suffragette Sarah Grimké, Kidd’s novel is set in motion on Sarah’s 11th birthday, when she is given ownership of 10-year-old Handful. The Invention of Wings follows these two women over the next 35 years as both strive for lives of their own, dramatically shaping each other’s destinies and forming a complex relationship marked by guilt, defiance, estrangement, and the uneasy ways of love.

The Invention of Wings
The Sheppy Dog Fund Lecture has been established to address the topics of art, religion and history prior to the 19th century, and is funded annually by the Sheppy Dog Fund, Dr. Alan Klein, Advisor.
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Flint Institute of Arts
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Flint, Michigan 48503
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