Lectures & Discussions
  • January | February
  • March | April
  • May | August
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  • November | December
Book Discussion
The House Girl: A Novel
by Tara Conklin

Part II: Book Discussion
March 4 • 1:30p
Isabel Hall

Free to the public.

The House Girl, the historical fiction debut by Tara Conklin, is an unforgettable story of love, history, and a search for justice, set in modern-day New York and 1852 Virginia. Weaving together the story of an escaped slave in the pre-Civil War South and a determined junior lawyer, The House Girl follows Lina Sparrow as she looks for an appropriate lead plaintiff in a lawsuit seeking compensation for families of slaves. In her research, she learns about Lu Anne Bell, a renowned prewar artist whose famous works might have actually been painted by her slave, Josephine.

Our first meeting will set the stage by exploring African American art. Two weeks later, we'll meet to discuss the novel. Books are available in the Museum Shop.


FIA book discussions focus on works of fiction and non-fiction related to art, art museums, or FIA collections. The first meeting for each book sets the stage by exploring artists and artwork related to the selected book. Two weeks later, the book is discussed. These free programs are offered on Wednesdays at 1:30p.
The House Girl
bray lecture series
Louis C. Tiffany's Memorial Art
March 21 • 2:00p
Patricia Pongracz



Guest Lecturer
Patricia C. Pongracz
Andrew W. Mellon Fellow at the
Metropolitan Museum of Art


Free to the public.

Patricia C. Pongracz will discuss Tiffany Studios' work for churches, synagogues, and family memorials like the Bellairs-Bishop-Miner Memorial Window, recently donated to the Flint Institute of Arts.

For 14 years, Pongracz was affiliated with the Museum of Biblical Art (MOBIA) in New York City, where she was the museum's Acting Director and Director of Curatorial affairs until June 2013. Pongracz co-curated a number of exhibitions at MOBIA and co-authored and co-edited numerous publications, including Louis C. Tiffany and the Art of Devotion, Perspectives on Medieval Art: Learning through Looking, and Biblical Art and the Asian Imagination.

Pongracz received her M.A. and Ph.D. in the History of Art and Architecture from Brown University, Providence, RI, and was a recipient of multiple grants and awards. Most recently, she was awarded an Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship by the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Under the auspices of the American Wing, from September 2014 through August 2015, she is conducting research on Tiffany Studios' interiors designed for American synagogues from 1890 through 1930.

Immediately following the lecture, the Bellairs-Bishop-Miner Memorial Window will be unveiled.

Bellairs-Bishop-Miner Memorial Window
Bellairs-Bishop-Miner Memorial Window
Louis Comfort Tiffany (American, 1848–1933); Tiffany Studios
Design attributed to Agnes F. Northrop (American, 1857–1953)
Leaded Favrile glass, 47 3/8 x 31 1/8 inches
Gift of the Bellairs-Bishop-Miner Family, 2014.35
bray lecture series
Ruins & the Anxiety of Decline
April 10 • 6:00p
Guest Lecturer
Dr. Dora Apel
Professor & W. Hawkins Ferry Endowed Chair in
Modern & Contemporary Art History, Wayne State University


Free to the public.

Focusing on Detroit, Flint and other cities facing urban deterioration, this talk critically examines the contemporary imagery of ruination and considers its cultural and political functions. It argues that the global popularity of ruin images serves to contain and control pervasive fears of decline.
Dr. Dora Apel
Dr. Dora Apel
Book Discussion
The Goldfinch
by Donna Tartt

Part I: Art Lecture
April 22 • 1:30p
Isabel Hall

Part II: Book Discussion
May 6 • 1:30p
Isabel Hall

Free to the public.

Composed with the skills of a master, The Goldfinch is a haunted odyssey through present-day America and a drama of enthralling force and acuity. It begins with a boy. Theo Decker, a 13-year-old New Yorker, miraculously survives an accident that kills his mother. Abandoned by his father, Theo is taken in by the family of a wealthy friend. Bewildered by his strange new home on Park Avenue, disturbed by schoolmates who don't know how to talk to him, and tormented above all by his longing for his mother, he clings to the one thing that reminds him of her: a small, mysteriously captivating painting that ultimately draws Theo into the criminal world.

The Goldfinch combines unforgettably vivid characters, mesmeriz-ing language, and breathtaking suspense, while plumbing with a philosopher's calm the deepest mysteries of love, identity, and art. It is a beautiful, stay-up-all-night-and-tell-your-friends triumph, an old-fashioned story of loss and obsession, survival and self-invention, and the ruthless machinations of fate.

Our first meeting sets the stage with a discussion of the art mentioned in the novel. Two weeks later, we'll meet to discuss the book. Books are available in the Museum Shop.


FIA book discussions focus on works of fiction and non-fiction related to art, art museums, or FIA collections. The first meeting for each book sets the stage by exploring artists and artwork related to the selected book. Two weeks later, the book is discussed. These free programs are offered on Wednesdays at 1:30p.
The House Girl
Book Discussions

Previous Book Discussion
Thus Was Adonis Murdered
Sarah Caudwell

Both a murder mystery and comedy of errors, this delightful novel by British writer Sarah Caudwell is the story of Julia Larwood, a young barrister who finds herself accused of murder while on an art lover's tour of Venice. A friend comes to her aid and unravels the clues, discovering an art theft, an impersonation, and the identity of the killer. Our first meeting will set the stage by exploring some of the artworks mentioned in the book. Two weeks later, we'll meet to discuss the novel. Books are available in the Museum Shop.

Thus Was Adonis MurderedBy Sarah Caudwell

FIA book discussions focus on works of fiction and non-fiction related to art, art museums, or FIA collections.
Previous Book Discussion
Headlong: A Novel

by Michael Frayn


Previous Thompson Lecture
Powerful Portraits
An Intimate Look at Humanity

Guest Lecturer
Platon
Photographer
Previous Sheppy Dog Fund Lecture

The Origins of Art & Its Implications
Guest Lecturer
Harold L. Dibble
Professor, Dept. of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania

Lecture Sponsor
WKAR lecture sponsor


Dr. Alan Klein

The Sheppy Dog Fund Lecture has been established to address the topics of art, religion and history prior to the 19th century, funded annually by the Sheppy Dog Fund, Dr. Alan Klein, Advisor.
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Flint Institute of Arts
1120 East Kearsley Street
Flint, Michigan 48503
p  810.234.1695
f   810.234.1692
Hours
Monday–Wednesday & Friday
Thursday
Saturday
Sunday
12:00p – 5:00p
12:00p – 9:00p
10:00a – 5:00p
1:00p – 5:00p
American Alliance of Museums MemberCharles Stewart Mott FoundationMichigan Council for Arts & Cultural Affairsnational endowment for the arts